Blue Plaque

Sapper Hackett Blue Plaque to be Unveiled

The Mexborough Heritage Blue Plaque Society are proud to announce that a plaque commemorating Mexborough’s Victoria Cross Recipient, Sapper William Hackett will be unveiled his former Home at 43 Crossgate, Mexborough on Sunday June 23rd 2019 at 11.00 am.

Hackett, who had settled in Mexborough as a miner, signed up for the Royal Engineers and became tunneller in 1915.

In June 1916 the tunnel he was working on with four other men collapsed after enemy shelling. The London Gazette from that August reported on his bravery, during the subsequent rescue attempt.

“After working for 20 hours, a hole was made through fallen earth and broken timber, and the outside party was met. Sapper Hackett helped three of the men through the hole and could easily have followed, but refused to leave the fourth, who had been seriously injured, saying,” I am a tunneller, I must look after the others first.” Meantime, the hole was getting smaller, yet he still refused to leave his injured comrade. Finally, the gallery collapsed, and though the rescue party worked desperately for four days, the attempt to reach the two men failed. Sapper Hackett well knowing the nature of sliding earth, the chances against him, deliberately gave his life for his comrade”

All are welcome to attend the unveiling.

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Allport's Eye

The Livesey Dynasty

Thomas Livesey gave up his job as a railway engineer to create a travelling theatre group.Hhe illustration below shows them on their way to the next mining town with their portable “Paragon Theatre”. In later years they would build the Prince of wales theatre in Mexborough. Thomas had formed an acting dynasty which would last until the mid 20th Century.

Allport's Eye

Carleton Henry Allport


Carleton Henry Allport was born in Camberwell and spent all his working life in the service of the post office. he was the assistant operational supervisor of the Sheffield post office. When he retired he came to live in the Old Hall inConisborough. There he spent the rest of his days perusing antiquarian historical research, publishing numerous papers for local societies and writing his “History of Conisborough”. It was said that he could extract information from the most unpromising of sources. He died ages 62 in 1916.